Landscapers have many responsibilities to their clients and to the environment.

Controlling Invasive Plants in the Landscape

Landscapers have many responsibilities to their clients and to the environment. Landscape crews are often the first people who notice infestations of invasive plants. There are several ways of controlling invasive plants in the landscape both with invasive and non-invasive techniques. Invasive plants can be controlled with herbicides and Valley Green has a variety to choose from. Contact one of our locations if you need assistance in controlling plants in the landscape. Here are some more ways to control invasive plants.

Controlling invasive plants in the landscape with prevention
Prevention and early detection of invasive plants is usually the most economic and effective way to manage them. If your crew uses landscape vehicles, ensure that they are clear of invasive plants and seeds. If you must spread soil or gravel, try getting a high-quality brand that is less likely to carry invasive plant seeds. Using a certified weed-free seed mix in places where the soil is disturbed will help in providing competition for any new invasive plants that may want to grow.

What to do if you discover an infestation of invasive plants.
All infestations of invasive plants must be treated and eradicated quickly. There are often groups in cities and towns that will assist in helping landscape contractors deal with these infestations. Invasive plants often grow by roadways, railways, and waterways. If your crew is working by any of these corridors, you should inspect it for invasive plant spread before beginning any major work.

Mechanical control of invasive plants in the landscape.
Mechanical control of invasive plants usually means mowing or cutting them down. This, however, only limits seed production. The plants must be removed before they go to seed to be an effective method of control. After the mechanical control takes place, the plants should be cut as close to the ground as possible. After that, it is a good idea to pull them out by hand or with tools to control root growth. Keep in mind that mechanical control may not be suitable on steep slopes or unstable terrain. Another reason that mechanical control may not be suitable is that plants that are not invasive may also be cut down.

Chemical control of invasive plants.
Herbicides are often a great solution for controlling invasive plants in the landscape. Selecting the proper herbicide will depend on the plant species and environmental conditions. If there are infestations near bodies of water, keep in mind that the area could be too environmentally sensitive to use herbicides. Always check local regulations before applying a large-scale application of herbicides. Keep in mind that certain types of invasive plants (especially ones with waxy or hairy leaves) may not absorb the herbicide. You will also have to keep an eye out for noninvasive plants as they can be killed by the herbicide.

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