The FAQs About Winter Dormant Seeding

The FAQs About Winter Dormant Seeding

The FAQs About Winter Dormant Seeding

There is a saying that if you are a lazy turf grower then you will love winter dormant seedings. If you ever wanted to pretend you’re Johnny Appleseed, winter dormant seeding is the way to go because all you have to do is throw the seed down. There is no soil prep needed. Valley Green’s most popular products are our collection of grass seed blends. Most of our customers do their seeding in spring and fall but there are a few that practice winter dormant seeding. With winter on the way, today we are going to talk about the FAQs about winter dormant seeding.

The FAQs About Winter Dormant Seeding

What is winter dormant seeding?

Winter dormant seeding is the distribution of grass seed at a time that is outside their normal germination time. This allows the seed to be in place and ready to germinate when the conditions will allow it.

How does winter dormant seeding work?

When practicing winter dormant seeding, Mother Nature does most of the work for you. Snow and rain from January and February will pretty much plant the seed for you. It is interesting thing to watch because you will see the grass seed disappear right before your eyes as the soil pulls it in.

When is the ideal time to practice winter dormant seeding?

Winter dormant seeding should only be done after the soil temperature drops below fifty degrees. For the northeast, that time is usually late fall.

What are the advantages of winter dormant seeding?

Winter dormant seedlings will sprout an average of fifteen days earlier than conventional seeding. This gives the seedlings a lead in the race against broadleaf weeds and grasses that compete with it for survival in spring.

What are the disadvantages of winter dormant seeding?

Winter dormant seedlings are the most successful on level grades and not where the soil is prone to erosion. Take that into consideration when picking the spot to distribute the seeds. You’ll also have seed at a higher rate because there tends to be a higher mortality rate with winter dormant seedlings. This can cause the seed to be more expensive because you need to use more of it. Also, if you use pre-emergent herbicides, you’ll have to modify your application process as the herbicide may kill the seedlings.

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