Ways to Help Increase the Effectiveness of Fungicides

Ways to Help Increase the Effectiveness of Fungicides

There has been an increase in reports of diseases that are resistant to fungicides all over the northeastern United States. We sell several different types of fungicides and have learned of various techniques that our customers use to help increase the effectiveness of the fungicides. Spring is a great time to apply preventative fungicides as well as curative ones. Read on to learn some ways to help increase the effectiveness of fungicides.

Find out the cause of the disease before applying the fungicide.

For the fungicide to be effective, the problem must be diagnosed correctly. Questions to ask are what is the cause of the disease and what disease is it? When ready to use the correct fungicide, read the label and follow the instructions. This protects the plant you are trying to treat as well as protects you and the environment.

Remember that there are preventative vs. curative fungicides.

Preventive fungicides work by preventing the disease from getting into the plant. It must come into direct contact with the fungus and must be reapplied to new plant tissue or if the product gets washed off. Curative fungicides help clear up diseases after the infection has started. If you already have observed symptoms, it is time to use a curative fungicide. Using these two types of products correctly can help increase the effectiveness of the fungicides.

Using contact vs. mobile fungicides.

Contact fungicides are not absorbed by the plant and stick to its surface. They provide a barrier that prevents fungus from entering the plant and damaging its tissue. Mobile fungicides (also known as systemic products or penetrants) are absorbed by the plant and can move to new and old tissues. Movement amounts vary by fungicide type.

What causes a fungicide to be ineffective?

The most common reason for a fungicide to fail is that the disease has become resistant to it. Another reason could be an incorrect diagnosis. This goes back to the importance of finding the cause of the disease and what the disease is. For example, if the disease ends up being bacterial, fungicides will not be effective against it. If you are using a sprayer to apply your fungicide, this can also cause the disease to become resistant to the product. Spraying at a lower rate will cause this.

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